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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: with that, mr. chairman, i yield three members to the gentleman from indiana, r. rokita. mr. rokita: i thank chairman ryan in bringing this budget to the floor. i rise in high support of it. i also am very proud, one of the highest honors i have had in my short time here to serve on this committee. not because of chairman ryan only, but because of the members. by members, i mean republican and democrat mem
to work, taking a shared responsibility approach to our long-term deficits so we bring them down in a balanced smart way and they rejected the idea that we're going to move the economy forward by giving windfall tax cuts to the very wealthiest in the country and the benefits of that would trickle down and lift everybody up. they rejected that lopsided approach that balance the budgets on the backs of everybody but the folks at the very top. balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education by slashing important investments. in that category of spending we make these important investments for our country and our future, they double the cut from the sequester. so those are our investments in our kids' education. those are our investments in science and research to help power our economy. those are our investments to help modernize our infrastructure. they cut transportation by 15% when we have 15% unemployment in the construction industry. so mr. chairman, the american people rejected the kind of uncompromising lopsided approach that we see once again presented here in the hou
and better jobs for the american people. after all the budgets that never balance and record deficits, job creation, we would be coming off the four best years in modmodern american history, because we had four $1 trillion deficits in a row. another that will, quote, only be $850 billion this year. that's yielded us less than 2% growth a year. we all know if we took the number of americans that have left the work force and recalculated unemployment rate, it wouldn't be 7.8%, it would be about 10.5%. the path that my friends on the other side recommend doesn't work. and the balance in both the r.s.c. budget and ryan budget are much more promising course. they achieve that balance by not raising taxes, while not raising taxes. i think that's very important, too. we certainly aren't undertaxed in this country. my friends on the other side clearly believe that we are. they are going to offer multiple tax increases in all their budgets. i like the budget that does not require tax increases. finally, both these budgets, the republican study committee budget and the republican budget, come to gri
the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. so, mr. president, we have a few more hours of debate this morning between now and 11:00, followed by some votes, and then we will close out debate and move on to all the rest of the votes that we will take before final passage sometime late tonight or early tomorrow morning. i ask the senate -- as the senate majority leader said, we have hundreds of amendments filed. if we were to vote on every one of them, we would be here voting every single hour all the way through monday or tuesday. i know most members know that's not going to happen. so i would really encourage every member of the senate to work with the manager on their side to let us know which amendments are your priority so we can get them up sooner rather than later and vote on the ones that you want us to. so i urge all of our colleagues to work with us and our staffs and with ranking member sessions and his staff to make sure we know what your priorities are, how you would like to proceed, and w
budget. they now claim their budget would eliminate the deficit in 2023. and house budget committee chairman paul ryan has even said that it doesn't really matter how their budget eliminates the deficit. mr. president, americans across our country who will feel the impact of the choices we make in the coming weeks and months feel that it does matter. so while some of my republican colleagues would probably prefer not to hear about it, i think that the impact of the house republican budget is a crucial part of this debate, and we owe it to the american people to put our opinions on the record. now we've come a long way, mr. president, but there are still far too many americans today who are unemployed or underemployed, which is why our senate budget's first priority is boosting our economic recovery. speaker boehner has actually agreed with president obama that our debt does not present -- quote -- "an immediate crisis." so you might think the house budget would phase in cuts responsibly so we can protect our fragile recovery. well, instead the house republican budget would do seriou
to get anything going and that's the way to deal with the deficits, of course. and there were some measures there. no national insurance payments for employees for the first few thousand pounds reducing corporation tax earlier to 20%. infrastructure spending, could it be more? businesses would always want more. but there was acknowledgement he tried while keeping the next fiscally neutral. on the whole, businesses say, not bad, could have done more. i think that will be the summation for them. the key factor, of course, is if you're not going to do more to stimulate your own growth, what happens to the eurozone becomes even more important. and i did speak to the chancellor, george osborne, just a short while ago and i asked him how worried is he about what's going on in cypress? this is what he had to say. >> it is a worrying situation in cypress and i think there's been some sole rans in international markets and elsewhere that they've got to sort these problems out. but obviously, we now need a solution. if i would have concerns if these depositors, less than a hundred thousand e
to reduce the deficit. unfortunately, rather than seriously considering the credible path that we have presented in our budget plan, some republicans have decided to play some games with the numbers, and they just are not telling the truth. instead of subtracting the sequestration replacement portion in the investment package from the $975 billion in total revenue, they're trying to say that you should somehow add them all together. they are taking one side of the ledger, combining it with the other side of the ledger and coming to some conclusion that makes absolutely no sense to us. mr. president, this would be like handing over $2 to buy a cup of coffee and having someone say, well the price was actually $2 plus the value of that coffee. it doesn't make any sense. and, by the way, you don't have to take my word for it. fact checkers and reporters have called this claim false and a step too far. and "the washington post" fact correcter even gave it two pinocchios. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record a story from "the washington post" on this inaccurate clai
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
that the republicans are a little bit too root canal, a little bit too debt-obsessed, a little bit too deficit-obsessed and don't talk about the economy and jobs, which polls still show are the number-one issue. >> yeah, they've got to go back to reagan and jack kemp to stop acting like consequence at this pated accountants and get focused on what makes this economy grow. and the way you get revenues, not by raising taxes, by growth. if we had normal growth rates, we would get another 4 or 500 billion right off the bat. that's what they should focus on. all a means to an end. on social security, stop coming across that you're going to, you know, do something to grandma and instead talk about the idea, which they haven't, they don't touch it, of having accounts for young people with proper controls where they own the fruits of their labor, not washington politicians. make it positive instead of this -- as you say, root canal, that was more graphic. >> i think that -- i don't want to get -- i want to talk about the corporate tax, but i want to add to this, i think in a sense obama was right. and
up by the fed money printing. our deficit is as well as it makings it cheaper for poll tish shuns to borrow. former representative ron paul says why the fed is addicted to the this. you don't want to miss ron paul coming up. lauren: despite the cyprus scare, our next guest says they offer good investments. he will tell you which ones to buy. his answers certainly surprised me. lauren: time for a quick speed read of some of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute of the first up, general motors recalling 34,000 vehicles to fix transmissions. recall affects 2013 buick lacrosse and cadillac srx crossover models. >>> u.s. crude oil production set to pass imports for the first time in 18 years. the gap between monthly oil production and imports is projected to be nearly two million barrels per day by 2014. >>> neiman marcus settles with the federal trade commission after claiming its products were made with faux fur when they contained real fur. it prohibits the retailer from violating those laws for 20 years. >>> total number of mortgage applications subpoena applied for i
the reason why there isn't any wiggle room, because one, cutting the deficit, democrats propose cutting it $1.85 trillion, half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes. the republican plan, paul ryan plan, would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion in ten years and includes repealing obamacare. the hope going through the legislative process they might be able to find compromise to strike some sort of deal. >> we need to put americans back to work. that's our first priority. deficit reduction i would put as the second priority and one that is coupled with economic growth the so i think we can do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> reporter: bottom line, bill, american people are seeing this over and over again. republicans and democrats fighting on both sides of the aisle and perhaps, they can come together for a grand bargain but just doesn't appear to be the case right now. as they grapple with the budget, keep in mind that two weeks away they have to come up with a continuing resolution by march 27. bill: as ryan says, at least there is baseline f
that trying dollars deficit can quickly spin out of control because interest rates growth and people don't want to borrow going to get. if interest rates go up, the united states is even worse here the deficit will go up even more. what is already in the current situation will spin out of control very easily like we've seen happen in greece and other countries. that want to talk about the impact of obama's views on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much th
's deficits were unpatriotic and a fraction of what these are. and 2009 cut the deficit in half he the end of the first term and that was essentially ignored in 2012 when he ran for reelection and failed to do that and mentioned one time in the newscast in one year. and 2012 told msnbc taking care of the deficit being the first order of business, this week, or last week, he said no and you're not going to get a balanced budget for the the sake of balance and sustainable for the next ten years. i think he's clearly moving the goal post, a watch dog press would be all over this, but seem to be ignoring this. you should see the e-mails, our viewers are all over it. rich, thank you. tax the rich not playing well overseas or at home for that matter. listen to this. >> in france, the approval rating of the socialist president hollande has plummeted to a mere 31%. remember, hollande came to office proposing a huge tax on the rich. here, bill maher of all people are turning against high taxes. yes, bill maher. complaining about how high his taxes are, would you know it. the man who gave a million
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
of spending decisions that add up to massive debt and deficit. tonight, there is a week-long series on what to cut. >> government is not the solution to the problem. government the problem. >> rare of big government is over. >> every president called to streamline federal bureaucracy but none succeeded. >> government is largeer than it ever has been. the debt is growing at record rate. >> adjusted for inflation. government spending went up from $882 billion spent every year in 1980s to $1.48 trillion in the 1990s. $2.24 trillion a year and the first decade of the 21st century. mast ited that government will have spent almost as much in the first four years as a new decade as in the 1990s. >> in the past there bar crisis like world war ii or the korean war, nondefense spending was cut by 20 to 30%. >> that didn't happen after 9/11 or after the financial crisis. >> nothing typifies the expansion of government as much as the growing wealth of the washington, d.c. area. region with few neutral resources and little manufacturerring to produce well. the average government worker compensation is o
it in for the dunk to cut the deficit to one. st. louis was just too much. cody ellis drains the three to give st. louis a six-point lead. they go on to win 62-56. so st. louis plan to watch the ncaa selection at the airport but they ran into traffic so they settled for watching it at a best buy in new jersey. look, it comes with comedy la-z-boys. don't expect to see defending champion kentucky, they were left out of the big dance. we start in the midwest where louisville claim the top 87 all seed in the tournament. should they win they'll face the winner of the colorado state versus missouri game. in the west, gonzaga got the number one seed but they've got a tough road. they would face the winner of the pitt versus wichita state game in the second round. on the other side of the bracket kansas took the top seed in the south but they have a date with either unc or villanova should they advance to the round of 32. in the east, indiana starts as the top seed. it's second seed miami that has a lot of people talking. they'll face pacific in the opening round. then vegas likes louisville to take the
of the american people, including the majority of self-identified republicans that we can move forward on deficit reduction in a balanced way. >> bret: senior political analyst brit hume in miami tonight with thoughts on the charm offensive. good evening, you look sun-shiney in miami. >> life is good here, bret. you should come. i hope you will be here soon. >> bret:ly indeed. what do you think of the charm offensive? >> well, it was a remarkably sudden conversion by the president from an attitude of, you know, up yours. i don't need you, to i want to get together to talk with all of you. of course, the leaders in the, the republican leaders in congress who are smart enough not to act skeptical about it. they said they thought it was fine and good. more the better. but i think in the end, you have to ask a question, bret. simply this. is it likely that president obama will make any major concessions on the entitlement programs, without more new taxes? and the other side of that, of course, will republicans be willing to go along with more new taxes to get reform in entitlement programs. unless yo
we go deficit reduction. you saw minutes 6-3. there was expectation we had noises out from tucker that perhaps there might have been a bigger number voting for qe. what we will look at today is to see what osbourne does with the bank of england and there's a bunch of things he might do from amending the target, inflation target to changing the bank of england act saying we'll put in a jewel mandate. that may be more of a focus than anything he says about borrowing figures and growth numbers. >> absolutely. you can look at the sterling reaction here, ross. we're spiking above 151 now on the back of those minutes. melanie, over to you. i guess investors would have liked to see hints of a more accommodative bank of england here during the last meeting. might there not be more of a policy shift under way perhaps as ross said related to even changing the mandate? >> in terms of what we're expecting today, we do think that it might be the more interesting of the budget to watch. i wouldn't expect any big changes today. i think what he may do is announce a review of the policy fra framew
year believe they had a $37 million deficit in the city of 166 million. sitting there saying, you owe us $30 million per year. lighter nighter going back to pay. tried twice in the last year the charter renegotiate. the first time they tell them, and this is what is a believable. they did not qualify for hardship. i don't know what that means of the folks. what to they have to do, be under steep -- under siege by north korea? and then on top of that they give them the excuse that legally there's nothing we can do because our contract says are obligated to pay us so that we compare pensioners. gerri: thank you for coming on. appreciate your time. we will continue to paula. i hope you will come back. >> i would love to. thank you. gerri: are you underestimating your retirement needs to make the president of charles robb joins me next with a startling report. post with the big retirement planning mistakes that we're all making. stay with us. ♪ ♪ gerri: confident that your golden years? your survey finds that may not be the case. how to plan for your retirement coming up next. ♪ the
said he was going to fix the problem of billions of dollars in new taxes, and still deficits in the state was running under governor doyle, and he did it. you got some leaders who wants to make the right choices, and what ewe see down the road, they will be able to buoy up the funds and save the money for when they need it in circumstances like we see now with states saying they need to have money that they are no longer going to get because of sequester or the federal funds dry. sandra: you mentioned the sequester, and this is a way for the federal government to be forced to prioritize how to spend the funds. maybe we could see something at the state level as well because priorization is a big problem. how do we decide how to use these funds. >> right, right. you know, i hope so. i hope that what states do rather than taking money and spending it right away is they use it as a good opportunity for a little bit of intraspection, just a little as all states need, to look at bottom lines to tighten the budgets. with money coming in the door, my fear, and you see this in the sta
, italy because they're all suffering and because of too much spending, too much debt, deficit is too high. all right, senator, congratulations on your big win. i know when you announce if you're running for president you'll do it hear? you want to make that promise? >> oh, yeah, we didn't already announce it. >> sean: no, i'm just checking. thank you, senator. >> all right. >> sean: appreciate it. and coming up on "hannity." >> i studied the constitution myself. i'm roonebly well-educated and i thank you for the lecture. >> i would note that she chose not to answer the question that i asked. >> the answer is obvious no. >> sean: well, she did need the lecture, left wing senator dianne feinstein says she felt, quote, patronized by that exchange simply because she was asked about the assault weapons ban. and ted cruz will join me to respond and later dr. benjamin carson brought down the house over at cpac and hinting that he may run for the white house. i'll ask him about that and much more. this is a jam-packed edition of "hannity." much more straight ahead. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer
on the possible deficit reduction deal. hi, john. >> it's an interesting blend of confrontation and cooperation. call it a controlled battle because you've got the u.s. senate today taking up a bill to avert a government shutdown by sustaining government funding beyond march 27th. the house has already passed the bill. there are differences between the two chambers and the two parties on what they want to do to the effects of the the bill. it smoothed out some things. made it easier for the pentagon to adjust. the senate has other departments which it's trying to help. still some disagreements there. but they expect to be worked out by the end of the week. at the same time, there's a huge gap between the two long-term budget plans that the two parties are pushing. and john boehner over the weekend said, we're done with tax increases. he was repeating that position. the house white house responded, the senior adviser, saying no deal is possible as long as john boehner is in that place. so that's where we are, sue. you've got on the one hand the two parties working together. they are like my to a
. you think our deficit is bad, they don't print that much money in the fed. we don't have that much in the system. jon: jim gray, good to talk to you. thanks, jim. jenna: breaking news out of washington, d.c. the president is officially announcing his nomination for labor secretary. his name is thomas perez. he is standing next to the president. just a few things he should know about thomas perez. assistant attorney general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
deficit. we're spending a trillion more than we take in every year. everything has to be on the table. one thing i would suggest is that there are tipping points to everything. in the middle class segment people between $100,000 to $250,000 in home purchase price, mortgage interest makes sense to the middle class borrowers. and the question is do they count that when they look to buy a home versus rent. people stopping buying altogether. if it has an impact, how does that impact construction? has to be on the table. it has to be something we take in context with the broader picture. >> help us get rid of freddie and fannie some day too. put something together for me, will you? >> keep in mind, while we sit around and vilify freddie and fannie. >> see you love them. that's a shock. >> i don't. i think we ought to go away from them. but we need liquidity to ensure there's capital. >> can't do it now. especially now. all right. great hair. good looking man. and you watch, unlike some other people that work here. anyway, thanks, dave. >> you may not watch for a few minutes when you walk to get
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
if rates were liar. they had the time because rates were so much lower and deficit was going up slower. in a real sense the fed buying the treasuries has made it less painful for the government. >> i'm not sure if the population that chairs the euro or those that chair somewhat with central planning with regard to the 27 countries, but my question to you is i'm not sure we're going to lose any of these countries, but on the other hand, keeping their funding and the central bankers and the banks and insolvency all in line is a full -time job. is anybody worried about how we're growing these economies? is that the rally big elephant in the room? >> the growth hasn't phone zone up. we talked about it many times. what is the eventual exit strategy? our fed can't decide when to stop buying treasuries much less strengthen the balance sheet. >> i talked to jim bianco about the taper. this is another arena where the fed is going to paint themselves into a corner, they're going to move them up and down with every data point? in the end, they just have to say enough is enough, don't they? >> goi
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)